Ah, the internet. There’s many things to hate about the internet. As with any tool people use it to spread hate, to manipulate, to commit crimes, and to hurt others. I’ll admit that I control my children’s access to the internet (and in particular any forum where they can interact with others over the internet) as if the people on the other side of the screen can reach through it. But, of course, the internet also provide us with many wonderful opportunities that even twenty years ago we didn’t have.

One of the things I love about the internet is the democratisation of learning it has enabled. Not just through sites like Khan Academy, which I have used with my own kids and found really useful, or through market-places like Teachers Pay Teachers (which you know I sell resources through), but also through the unprecedented access it gives us to artefacts and documents that, once upon a time, only specialists would have access to.

An amazing example of this is the digitised manuscripts of the British Library. Being able to virtually leaf through books from the Middle Ages is amazing! And anyone with an internet connection and a computer can do this!

One of the many beautiful illustrations from the Queen Mary Psalter which you can view through the British Library

The Australian War Museum also has a wealth of photos, art, documents and artefacts that you can access with a click of a button.

The AWM allows us to access primary sources from both WW1 and WW2, as well as more recent conflicts

The Grand Egyptian Museum, while still under construction, has many of their artefacts displayed on their website, giving an up close and personal view of Ancient History from the comfort of our homes and classrooms.

Stela dedicated to Ptolemy V

In so many ways education is more accessible than ever. As someone who loves learning, who truly believes in the idea of ‘life long learners’, I feel so lucky. My hope is that one day all people can have access to these amazing resources and opportunities.

Tell me, do you feel the internet has democratised learning? What are some of your favourite sites? Anything you think I should check out? Share your thoughts in the comments.

1 Comments on “History at Your Fingertips”

  1. Pingback: How Can Teachers Balance Screen Time in the Classroom? – Platypi Learning

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